Aquarium warfare: Welcome to competitive sport of aquascaping at International Aquatic Plants Layout Contest

, posted in Gardening
The incredible marine artworks are entries into the competitive aquascaping contest which takes place every year and attracts thousand of competitorsThe incredible marine artworks are entries into the competitive aquascaping contest which takes place every year and attracts thousand of competitors Image source: Dailymail.co.uk

Aquarium designers from different corners of the world come to Japan to take part in Aquarium warfare at International Aquatic Plants Layout Contest, where trees seem to reach up to the sky in a lush green rainforest and the horizon stretches away into the distance. But everything is not as it seems as a tiny fish darts across one of the 'landscapes' pictured. In fact, these forest and hillside scenes are created entirely underwater for a competition.The incredible marine artworks are entries into this year's competitive aquascaping contest.
Designers use fern-like plants and grasses to create eye-catching scenes which only the resident fish give away as being immersed in water.

Landscape: This 'tree' stretches up to the 'sky' as fish drift lazily by in this underwater entry to the worldwide competition

Forest: Designers use fern-like plants and grasses to create eye-catching scenes which only the resident fish give away as being immersed in water

Some designs include cactus-like plants and rocks recreating a 'desert' scene and others show a 'beach' complete with fish that look as though they are floating above the sand.

Eye-catching: This design features a symmetrical rock formation complete with grassy areas and resident fish enjoying the atmosphere

Difficult: The world of competitive aquarium design, or aquascaping, is just as difficult, expensive, and cutthroat as any other sport

Winners: The 2013 top prize went to Truong Thinh Ngo, of Vietnam, and the top-placed Brit was a Stu Worrall in 82nd place

International Aquatic Plants Layout Contest annually ranks hundreds of competitors from around the world with Asian and Eastern European countries generally dominating the top slots.
The world of competitive aquarium design, or aquascaping, is just as difficult, expensive, and cutthroat as any other sport but requires expertise in many different fields to guarantee success.

Aquarium designers have to master biology, design, photography as well as having huge amounts of patience as the projects can take years

Some designs include cactus--like plants and rocks recreating a 'desert' scene which even has a shoal of fish swimming over the horizon

Aquarium designers have to master biology, design, photography as well as having huge amounts of patience. Individual aquascapes can take months if not years to fully mature into a completed landscape.

Hidden caves: This landscape includes a hidden nook inside the bottom of some tree roots underwater and a pathway leading into the distance

Last year's competition received 2,164 applications from 57 countries and the organisers are expecting more this year

Contrast: The sharp rocks stand out against the bright green of the plants in this carefully-created aquascape which was another entry in the contest

International Aquatic Plants Layout Contest annually ranks hundreds of competitors from around the world with Asian and Eastern European countries scooping top slots

Last year's competition has received 2,164 applications from 57 countries and the organisers are expecting more before the closing date of May 31 this year.

Surreal: This design shows a 'beach' complete with fish that look as though they are floating above the sand and the crystallised blue sea

 

Winding path: Only the ripples of the water above and the small group of goldfish swimming past reveal the true nature of this underwater scene

Accolades: The winner of the annual competition will received one million Japanese Yen, about £5,800, as well as a certificate and award

Lush: This design seems to recreate the lush green environment of a rainforest - all completely submerged in a fishtank

 

Sandy: This designer has used fine sand to create a white pathway twisting through rocks and trees in his competition entry

Murky: The background of the tank cannot be seen in this underwater recreation of a forest that was entered into the competition

The 2013 top prize went to Truong Thinh Ngo, of Vietnam, and the top-placed Brit was Stu Worrall, a photographer from Cheshire, in 82nd place.
The winner will received one million Japanese Yen, about £5,800, as well as a certificate and award.

Source: Dailymail.co.uk

Published on: 01/16/2014

 

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